Richard Ferter

Richard Ferter

WarpTheme offer free high quality Joomla! Templates and WordPress Themes for you to create beautiful websites
Website URL: http://warptheme.com

If someone says ‘startup founder’ to you, chances are that you’ll immediately think of a 21-year-old kid straight out of college, looking to change the world with a photo-sharing app.

While that stereotype is a stereotype for a reason (there are lots of people who fit that mold), there are plenty of older people who become tech entrepreneurs after long and successful careers in more conventional lines of work.

What made people aged 40+ take such a big change of direction in their lives? And was it worth it? Is not fitting the stereotype an advantage or not? I decided to find out.

Read on; it might convince you to make the jump, too.

John Berthels

Age 47. Based in Nottingham, UK. Co-founder of Cocoon.

I used to be with Trend Micro after the startup I worked for got acquired by them. Like a lot of men in their mid-40s I started to think about the themes of my life and decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur. It’s the same motivation that leads men to drive across the US on a motorbike.

I had ideas for my own startup project but the Cocoon team was forming at the same time and I ended up joining as a cofounder. We’ve taken the project first to crowdfunding and on to our first funding round.

Has your age affected your life as a startup founder?

It’s helped prepare me for not being worried about my capabilities in scaling the company. I know what company I want to build and know what kinds of things I need to consider while doing it. That’s because of the experience I’ve gained through my career as I’ve gradually increased in seniority.

People are relatively open minded about my age. When we meet people, they’re not always sure who’s in charge. The oldest person on the founding team isn’t necessarily the most senior or experienced, as you might expect.

The hard part is walking away from a steady job. I’ve got three kids. It’s only been possible to become an entrepreneur with deep support from my partner.

What would you say to someone thinking of moving from a steady job into entrepreneurship?

Longterm happiness is important. With a strong relationship you can put your collective happiness on the line because you’re in it together. You have permission to fail – you can take that step into the unknown because someone is there to pick you up if you fail, with the understanding that you’ll do the same for them.

Give yourself a window of time to explore your entrepreneurial plans and have a plan B and plan C ready for if you haven’t made enough progress after that time is up.

Donnerstag, 14 Januar 2016 03:31

Clients from Hell: The Hardest Copy of all

If someone says ‘startup founder’ to you, chances are that you’ll immediately think of a 21-year-old kid straight out of college, looking to change the world with a photo-sharing app.

While that stereotype is a stereotype for a reason (there are lots of people who fit that mold), there are plenty of older people who become tech entrepreneurs after long and successful careers in more conventional lines of work.

What made people aged 40+ take such a big change of direction in their lives? And was it worth it? Is not fitting the stereotype an advantage or not? I decided to find out.

Read on; it might convince you to make the jump, too.

John Berthels

Age 47. Based in Nottingham, UK. Co-founder of Cocoon.

I used to be with Trend Micro after the startup I worked for got acquired by them. Like a lot of men in their mid-40s I started to think about the themes of my life and decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur. It’s the same motivation that leads men to drive across the US on a motorbike.

I had ideas for my own startup project but the Cocoon team was forming at the same time and I ended up joining as a cofounder. We’ve taken the project first to crowdfunding and on to our first funding round.

Has your age affected your life as a startup founder?

It’s helped prepare me for not being worried about my capabilities in scaling the company. I know what company I want to build and know what kinds of things I need to consider while doing it. That’s because of the experience I’ve gained through my career as I’ve gradually increased in seniority.

People are relatively open minded about my age. When we meet people, they’re not always sure who’s in charge. The oldest person on the founding team isn’t necessarily the most senior or experienced, as you might expect.

The hard part is walking away from a steady job. I’ve got three kids. It’s only been possible to become an entrepreneur with deep support from my partner.

What would you say to someone thinking of moving from a steady job into entrepreneurship?

Longterm happiness is important. With a strong relationship you can put your collective happiness on the line because you’re in it together. You have permission to fail – you can take that step into the unknown because someone is there to pick you up if you fail, with the understanding that you’ll do the same for them.

Give yourself a window of time to explore your entrepreneurial plans and have a plan B and plan C ready for if you haven’t made enough progress after that time is up.

If someone says ‘startup founder’ to you, chances are that you’ll immediately think of a 21-year-old kid straight out of college, looking to change the world with a photo-sharing app.

While that stereotype is a stereotype for a reason (there are lots of people who fit that mold), there are plenty of older people who become tech entrepreneurs after long and successful careers in more conventional lines of work.

What made people aged 40+ take such a big change of direction in their lives? And was it worth it? Is not fitting the stereotype an advantage or not? I decided to find out.

Read on; it might convince you to make the jump, too.

John Berthels

Age 47. Based in Nottingham, UK. Co-founder of Cocoon.

I used to be with Trend Micro after the startup I worked for got acquired by them. Like a lot of men in their mid-40s I started to think about the themes of my life and decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur. It’s the same motivation that leads men to drive across the US on a motorbike.

I had ideas for my own startup project but the Cocoon team was forming at the same time and I ended up joining as a cofounder. We’ve taken the project first to crowdfunding and on to our first funding round.

Has your age affected your life as a startup founder?

It’s helped prepare me for not being worried about my capabilities in scaling the company. I know what company I want to build and know what kinds of things I need to consider while doing it. That’s because of the experience I’ve gained through my career as I’ve gradually increased in seniority.

People are relatively open minded about my age. When we meet people, they’re not always sure who’s in charge. The oldest person on the founding team isn’t necessarily the most senior or experienced, as you might expect.

The hard part is walking away from a steady job. I’ve got three kids. It’s only been possible to become an entrepreneur with deep support from my partner.

What would you say to someone thinking of moving from a steady job into entrepreneurship?

Longterm happiness is important. With a strong relationship you can put your collective happiness on the line because you’re in it together. You have permission to fail – you can take that step into the unknown because someone is there to pick you up if you fail, with the understanding that you’ll do the same for them.

Give yourself a window of time to explore your entrepreneurial plans and have a plan B and plan C ready for if you haven’t made enough progress after that time is up.

Donnerstag, 14 Januar 2016 03:31

10 Steps to Build and Market a Successful App

If someone says ‘startup founder’ to you, chances are that you’ll immediately think of a 21-year-old kid straight out of college, looking to change the world with a photo-sharing app.

While that stereotype is a stereotype for a reason (there are lots of people who fit that mold), there are plenty of older people who become tech entrepreneurs after long and successful careers in more conventional lines of work.

What made people aged 40+ take such a big change of direction in their lives? And was it worth it? Is not fitting the stereotype an advantage or not? I decided to find out.

Read on; it might convince you to make the jump, too.

John Berthels

Age 47. Based in Nottingham, UK. Co-founder of Cocoon.

I used to be with Trend Micro after the startup I worked for got acquired by them. Like a lot of men in their mid-40s I started to think about the themes of my life and decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur. It’s the same motivation that leads men to drive across the US on a motorbike.

I had ideas for my own startup project but the Cocoon team was forming at the same time and I ended up joining as a cofounder. We’ve taken the project first to crowdfunding and on to our first funding round.

Has your age affected your life as a startup founder?

It’s helped prepare me for not being worried about my capabilities in scaling the company. I know what company I want to build and know what kinds of things I need to consider while doing it. That’s because of the experience I’ve gained through my career as I’ve gradually increased in seniority.

People are relatively open minded about my age. When we meet people, they’re not always sure who’s in charge. The oldest person on the founding team isn’t necessarily the most senior or experienced, as you might expect.

The hard part is walking away from a steady job. I’ve got three kids. It’s only been possible to become an entrepreneur with deep support from my partner.

What would you say to someone thinking of moving from a steady job into entrepreneurship?

Longterm happiness is important. With a strong relationship you can put your collective happiness on the line because you’re in it together. You have permission to fail – you can take that step into the unknown because someone is there to pick you up if you fail, with the understanding that you’ll do the same for them.

Give yourself a window of time to explore your entrepreneurial plans and have a plan B and plan C ready for if you haven’t made enough progress after that time is up.

If someone says ‘startup founder’ to you, chances are that you’ll immediately think of a 21-year-old kid straight out of college, looking to change the world with a photo-sharing app.

While that stereotype is a stereotype for a reason (there are lots of people who fit that mold), there are plenty of older people who become tech entrepreneurs after long and successful careers in more conventional lines of work.

What made people aged 40+ take such a big change of direction in their lives? And was it worth it? Is not fitting the stereotype an advantage or not? I decided to find out.

Read on; it might convince you to make the jump, too.

John Berthels

Age 47. Based in Nottingham, UK. Co-founder of Cocoon.

I used to be with Trend Micro after the startup I worked for got acquired by them. Like a lot of men in their mid-40s I started to think about the themes of my life and decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur. It’s the same motivation that leads men to drive across the US on a motorbike.

I had ideas for my own startup project but the Cocoon team was forming at the same time and I ended up joining as a cofounder. We’ve taken the project first to crowdfunding and on to our first funding round.

Has your age affected your life as a startup founder?

It’s helped prepare me for not being worried about my capabilities in scaling the company. I know what company I want to build and know what kinds of things I need to consider while doing it. That’s because of the experience I’ve gained through my career as I’ve gradually increased in seniority.

People are relatively open minded about my age. When we meet people, they’re not always sure who’s in charge. The oldest person on the founding team isn’t necessarily the most senior or experienced, as you might expect.

The hard part is walking away from a steady job. I’ve got three kids. It’s only been possible to become an entrepreneur with deep support from my partner.

What would you say to someone thinking of moving from a steady job into entrepreneurship?

Longterm happiness is important. With a strong relationship you can put your collective happiness on the line because you’re in it together. You have permission to fail – you can take that step into the unknown because someone is there to pick you up if you fail, with the understanding that you’ll do the same for them.

Give yourself a window of time to explore your entrepreneurial plans and have a plan B and plan C ready for if you haven’t made enough progress after that time is up.

If someone says ‘startup founder’ to you, chances are that you’ll immediately think of a 21-year-old kid straight out of college, looking to change the world with a photo-sharing app.

While that stereotype is a stereotype for a reason (there are lots of people who fit that mold), there are plenty of older people who become tech entrepreneurs after long and successful careers in more conventional lines of work.

What made people aged 40+ take such a big change of direction in their lives? And was it worth it? Is not fitting the stereotype an advantage or not? I decided to find out.

Read on; it might convince you to make the jump, too.

John Berthels

Age 47. Based in Nottingham, UK. Co-founder of Cocoon.

I used to be with Trend Micro after the startup I worked for got acquired by them. Like a lot of men in their mid-40s I started to think about the themes of my life and decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur. It’s the same motivation that leads men to drive across the US on a motorbike.

I had ideas for my own startup project but the Cocoon team was forming at the same time and I ended up joining as a cofounder. We’ve taken the project first to crowdfunding and on to our first funding round.

Has your age affected your life as a startup founder?

It’s helped prepare me for not being worried about my capabilities in scaling the company. I know what company I want to build and know what kinds of things I need to consider while doing it. That’s because of the experience I’ve gained through my career as I’ve gradually increased in seniority.

People are relatively open minded about my age. When we meet people, they’re not always sure who’s in charge. The oldest person on the founding team isn’t necessarily the most senior or experienced, as you might expect.

The hard part is walking away from a steady job. I’ve got three kids. It’s only been possible to become an entrepreneur with deep support from my partner.

What would you say to someone thinking of moving from a steady job into entrepreneurship?

Longterm happiness is important. With a strong relationship you can put your collective happiness on the line because you’re in it together. You have permission to fail – you can take that step into the unknown because someone is there to pick you up if you fail, with the understanding that you’ll do the same for them.

Give yourself a window of time to explore your entrepreneurial plans and have a plan B and plan C ready for if you haven’t made enough progress after that time is up.

Samstag, 15 August 2015 15:00

Top 5 Joomla shopping carts

Do you want to start an online store? This guide will walk you through 4 of the best Joomla e-commerce extensions currently available.

1. Hikashop

HikaShop is an e-commerce solution for Joomla ! Built for simplicity and flexibility.

WordPress, Joomla and Drupal are open-source software, each developed and maintained by a community of thousands.

The CMS comparison chart below gives a summary of what each CMS has to offer. The following comparison chart can help guide beginners in choosing the best platform for their needs.

Samstag, 15 August 2015 02:48

Happy 10th Birthday Joomla!

On August 17 Joomla! will turn ten. 10 Years Together as a community, as contributors and as friends. For this special occasion co-founder, Brian Teeman, has created a website to celebrate 10 Years Together. As a community we’re selling unique and time-limited shirts.

10 Years, it’s quite an amazing achievement. Joomla! began on August 17, 2005 when a group of 17 young “fools” from across the globe took a big, bold step. If you want the read the whole story, please visit .

10 years later we are a community with over 200 user groups across the globe. We work together as a 100% volunteer effort of thousands of tireless contributors. And all this as friends who can achieve amazing things together.

Samstag, 15 August 2015 02:09

Joomla 3.4.3 released

Joomla 3.4.3 is now available. This is a maintenance release for the Joomla 3 series. We strongly encourage you update your sites.

Version 3.4.3 addresses a few issues:

  • The renaming of the ClassLoader.php file to classloader.php caused issues which in some isolated cases even broke the CMS.
  • When creating menus of type Smart Search or contact list for 3.4.2 invalid field warnings were displayed when trying to save.
  • The option to disable the count-join in JCategories is permanently enabled on multilingual sites, making extensions that don't use this feature and for example don't have a catid field in their table, fail.
  • Module, Article and Category creation applies a wrong default values for the access level. Instead of the one from the global configuration it just takes none, and thus the first in the list is selected (Guest).
  • The batch model cut the dropdown so you can’t access all items there
  • On the batch model we had some kind of scrollbar flashing
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